Jo's Web Wizardry

Jo Atherton

It’s true that in the digital world, business cards and postcards may be considered quite old fashioned, they remain an effective part of the artist’s marketing plan. Whether placed on a stall at a craft fair, distributed at a private view or given out during Open Studios, printed materials serve as an aide memoire - essential publicity for future commissions or opportunities.

This month, I consider two examples of printers using a friendly interface which will allow you to design professional materials online without any prior knowledge of graphic design or desktop publishing.

Moo - www.moo.com

The simple interface on the Moo website allows you to either use one of their 300+ stylish templates, or work with a blank design. In both cases, you can select a variety of options - choose background colours, fonts and text colour before uploading your personal choice of artwork.

The interface can easily be synced with Instagram, Facebook and Flickr to use images that you may have already uploaded and published online.

One of the good things about Moo designs are that you don’t have to restrict yourself to one design. It can be hard to decide on one piece of artwork which is representative of your entire portfolio, so Moo allow you to choose a number of different images which will be incorporated into one print run, at no extra cost.

Instantprint - www.instantprint.co.uk

As with Moo.com, Instantprint also have a nifty design interface which will allow you to work with their pre-designed templates, or customise your own. Themed templates can be browsed by industry, or you can customise your own, allowing you to upload examples of your own artwork and design accordingly. They also offer a free artwork check if you feel the need for a little extra hand-holding if the world of online design is very new to you.

With both of these examples, it would be very easy to create a professional suite of marketing materials, including postcards, business cards, stickers, leaflets and even greeting cards which all help to establish your own personal style and would assist you in what is a very competitive marketplace.

It’s true that online marketing can perhaps only complement those contacts one might make in real life, but intuitive technology allows us all to create professional looking, customised designs without the need for expensive graphic design fees. 

With 2015 looming on the horizon, perhaps it’s time to refresh your marketing materials, updating them with images of your recent work and also learn some new skills by designing your unique printed materials. Don’t forget you can also read up on branding yourself, in an article from 2013: As an artist, what is your brand?

By JO ATHERTON

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